The Lord’s Prayer from Luke, A Modern Interpretation

lord's prayer

The Lord’s Prayer from the Book of Luke 11:2-4

We get The Lord’s Prayer directly from the teaching of Jesus in the books of Matthew and Luke, which are essentially the same – save the version in Matthew is slightly longer and also the version most recited, especially as “Our Father” when doing Rosary Prayers or from Confession, etc..

Here is the King James Version (KJV) of The Lord’s Prayer from Luke 11:2-4:

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.
Give us day by day our daily bread.
And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us.
And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

This prayer changes from Bible to Bible and translation to translation.

Here is the Lord’s Prayer from Luke 11:2-4 in the International Standard Version (ISV), which reads as:

“ Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come.
Give us each day our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, for we also forgive everyone who sins against us.
And lead us not into temptation.”

The book of Luke, or the Gospel of Luke, was most probably composed is around 80–110 AD by the same pen as the writer of the Acts of the Apostles. Church tradition contends that the author was none other than Luke the Evangelist, the companion of Paul. Nevertheless, some scholars disagree. The Book of Luke was probably written about 44 to 74 years after the execution of Jesus in 36 AD, which is 10 to 30 years after the Destruction of the Second Jerusalem Temple.

In the Book of Luke, same as in the Book of Matthew, Jesus teaches us how to pray by teaching what’s called, “The Lord’s Prayer”.

Hebrew and Aramaic were the dominate languages used by the Jews in the time of Jesus. Latin and Greek were also present, as Jerusalem fell under Roman rule and Koine Greek (Biblical Greek) was the ‘common language’ in the region during that time period. After Jerusalem fell and the Jews were scattered in 70 AD, Koine Greek became the language most dominate in the region. This is why the original letters (books) of the Apostles, such as ‘Luke, Matthew, Mark, and John’ are written in Koine (Biblical) Greek.

Here is an image of a 3rd-century AD Greek papyrus of the Gospel of Luke written in Koine (biblical) Greek:


A 3rd-century AD Greek papyrus of the Gospel of Luke

Here is the original Greek version of Luke 11:2-4 (ΚΑΤΑ ΛΟΥΚΑΝ 11:2-4):

Πάτερ, ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου· ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου·
τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δίδου ἡμῖν τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν·
καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν, καὶ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἀφίομεν παντὶ ὀφείλοντι ἡμῖν·
καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν.

Let us translate The Lord’s Prayer given to us through the Book of Luke, word for word from its original Greek wording.

Luke 11:2

(Greek) Πάτερ, ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου, ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου.

Πάτερ (patér)

Father
Noun. (a father) “Father” in reference to a begetter, originator, progenitor – one in “intimate connection and relationship” (Gesenius).

ἁγιασθήτω (agiasthētō)

sanctified
Verb. aor pass imperat of ἁγιαζω, meaning to sanctify, make holy, set apart as sacred to God, consecrate, purify.
αγίας (agías) noun, genitive singular form of αγία (agía) meaning “saint”
θήτω is also to imply the inner being, such as the soul.
αγίας + θήτω = γιασθήτω, Sacred Inner Being. Sacred-Being, or Sacred-Soul.
Specifically, something that is “Sanctified” Most used: Blessed, Sacred, Hallowed.

τὸ (to)

the
Article. ὁ (ho) m, ἡ f (hē), τό n (tó)
(Epic, demonstrative) that
(Epic, third person personal pronoun) he, she, it, they
(relative, Epic, Ionic, poetic Attic) who, which, that

ὄνομά (onoma)

name
Noun. According to Hebrew notions, a name is inseparable from the person to whom it belongs, i.e. it is something of his essence. Therefore, in the case of the God, it is specially sacred” (Souter).

σου (sou)

you
Pronoun. genitive singular of σύ (sú) second person singular personal pronoun: you (thou)

Translating the first part of Luke 11:2 word for word, we have:

(GRK) Πάτερ, ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου
(Direct English) Father, sacred the name you
(Modern English) Father, your name is most sacred,
(NIV) Father, hallowed be your name,
(KLV) Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name,

The rest of the verse, word for word, from the original Greek is: ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου

ἐλθέτω (elthetō)

to come
Verb. an act. “Come” used in the first case is the verb “to come” (ἐλθέτω [elthetō], a third-person imperative form, used impersonally, of ἔρχεσθαι [erchesthai], “to come”).

ἡ (ē)

the
Article. ὁ (ho) m, ἡ f (hē), τό n (tó)
(Epic, demonstrative) that
(Epic, third person personal pronoun) he, she, it, they
(relative, Epic, Ionic, poetic Attic) who, which, that

βασιλεία (basileia)

Kingdom
Noun. (basileíā) f (genitive βασιλείᾱς); first declension
A kingdom, a dominion
A hereditary monarchy
The office of king
(in Athens) the office of archon
(with passive meaning) being ruled by a king

σου (sou)

you
Pronoun. genitive singular of σύ (sú) second person singular personal pronoun: you (thou)

We get:

(Greek) ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου
(Direct English) (to) come the Kingdom you
(Modern English) Your Kingdom comes.
(NIV) your kingdom come
(KLV) Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.

So the whole verse of Luke 11:2 is:

(GRK) Πάτερ, ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου, ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου.
(Direct Eng) Father, sanctified the name you, (to) come the Kingdom you.
(Modern Eng) Father, most sacred is your name, your Kingdom comes.
(NIV) Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come.
(KLV) Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name,Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.

This verse is often separated into two sentences, or at least treated as such, but it is a single sentence and statement acknowledging ‘The Father’ and ‘the coming of His Kingdom’. If we remove the praising (wording between the commas) in the verse, it reads as:
(GRK)
Πάτερ ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου.

(Direct Eng) Father (to) come the Kingdom you.
(Modern Eng) Father your Kingdom comes.

Of course we don’t want to remove the praising to The Father’s name, especially when Jesus made sure to add a praising to the Lord’s name.

His praise was:
(GRK) ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου
(Direct Eng) sanctified the name you
(Modern Eng) most sacred is your name
(NIV) hallowed be your name

In modern English, we’d commonly place the praise first, especially in prayer. This would make it read as:

Most Sacred Father your Kingdom is coming.
or
Most Blessed Father your Kingdom is coming.

This praises the Holy Father for who He is, the one’s name is most sacred – the “sacred-soul”.
additionally, this acknowledges Him as being ‘The Father’, ‘The Creator’.
and this also acknowledges the coming of His Kingdom on Earth (New Jerusalem to be established after the Second Coming of Christ).

With that being said, you could place the praising back between the commas as Jesus did, in such:

Father, praise to your sacred name, your Kingdom is coming. 

This later translation and paraphrasing of Luke 11:2 seems to me to be the most representative of the Prayer given by Jesus as said by the Book of Luke if Jesus were here today teaching it.

Let us continue to the next verse, Luke 11:3

Luke 11:3
(GRK) τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δίδου ἡμῖν τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν
(NIV)  Give us each day our daily bread.
(KLV) Give us day by day our daily bread.

Already we can see a huge difference in the amount of words from the original Greek into the common translation used for Luke 11:3.

Translating Luke 11:3 from Greek, word for word:

τὸν (ton)

the
Article. (weak personal) him (3rd person masculine singular, accusative)
m sg(definite) accusative masculine singular of ὁ (ho) m, ἡ f (hē), τό n (tó)
(Epic, demonstrative) that
(Epic, third person personal pronoun) he, she, it, they
(relative, Epic, Ionic, poetic Attic) who, which, that

ἄρτον

Bread but neither exactly nor literally, but metaphorically.
Noun.
Origen of Alexandria (2nd century) links the bread (τὸν ἄρτον) with the Eucharist. As for super-substantial, he says that it’s an indication that’s it’s more than just regular food. He writes, “The ‘true bread’ is that which nourishes the true humanity, the person created after the image of God” (Gibson; On Prayer 27.2).

St. Cyprian of Carthage (3rd century) writes, “Now we ask this bread to be given to us today, lest we who are in Christ and receive his Eucharist daily as the food of salvation should be separated from Christ’s body through some grave offense that prohibits us from receiving the heavenly bread…” (Leighton; Treatises, On the Lord’s Prayer 18).

St. Jerome (4th century) writes, “In the Gospel the term used by the Hebrews to denote supersubstantial bread is maar. I found that it means ‘for tomorrow,’ so that the meaning is ‘Give us this day our bread’ for tomorrow, that is, the future. We can also understand supersubstantial bread in another sense: bread that is above all substances and surpasses all creatures.” (Commentary on Matthew 1.6.11).

Tertullian (3rd century) wrote, “We should rather understand ‘give us this day our daily bread’ in a spiritual sense. For Christ is ‘our bread,’ because Christ is life, and the life is bread. “I am,’ he said, ‘the bread of life.’ …Then, because his body is considered to be in the bread, he said, ‘This is my body.’ When we ask for our daily bread, we are asking to live forever in Christ and to be inseparably united with his body” (On Prayer 6).

This isn’t just “bread” of which we eat and get our body’s nourishment. It is not a bread ration which we’d get as a provision to satisfy our current hunger and body’s needs. This is the divine provision, the ‘Bread of Life. The gift of eternal life from the Tree of Life. This “bread” from the “Tree of Life”, which we were fobade from having because of a grave sin committed by us.

Bread is but a metaphor of for the Tree of Life we were previously forbidden to eat.

τὸν ἄρτον is a metaphor for “The Fruit of Eternal Life”

ἡμῶν (émón)

our
Pronoun. genitive of ἡμεῖς (hēmeîs) (first person plural, personal pronoun) we, us, our

τὸν (ton)

the
Article. (weak personal) him (3rd person masculine singular, accusative)
m sg(definite) accusative masculine singular of ὁ (ho) m, ἡ f (hē), τό n (tó)
(Epic, demonstrative) that
(Epic, third person personal pronoun) he, she, it, they
(relative, Epic, Ionic, poetic Attic) who, which, that

ἐπιούσιον (epiousios)

for morrow
Noun. ἐπιούσιον is an unique word not found elsewhere in the original Scriptures of the Bible.

It is most often used as an adjective accompanying ‘bread’ as meaning bread.

By tradition, the most common English language translation is daily, used as an adjective accompanying ‘bread’.  Most scholars today reject this because while epioúsios is often substituted by the word “daily,” all of the other New Testament translations from the original Greek phrases into “daily” otherwise reference hēmérān (ἡμέρᾱν, “day”), which does not appear in this usage.

The actual appearance of the word in the Lord’s Prayer of Luke can be viewed here in Hanna Papyrus 1—”Mater Verbi” (Mother of the Word), known to scholars as P75, and the oldest surviving witness for certain New Testament passages—in the image below, 9th line

Hanna Papyrus 1 (Mater Verbi) (P75), f. 1B2v
(Luke 11:1-13; the Lord’s Prayer is found in lines 7-13)

Bruce M. Metzger writes in Bibliotheca Sacra 150 (July-September 1993) (pp 277–278):

“The great majority of these hapax legomena occur also in other Greek sources, and so the meaning of most of them is not often in dispute. The meaning, however, of a word in the Lord’s Prayer as recorded in Matthew 6:11 and Luke 11:3 has often been debated. Does “Give us this day our ἐπιούσιον bread” mean “daily bread” or “bread for tomorrow”? Except in subsequent quotations of the prayer, no other piece of Greek literature is known to contain this word. The only time it seems to have turned up was in 1889 when A. H. Sayce edited a fragmentary Greek papyrus containing a householder’s account-book listing the purchase of provisions. Here, according to Sayce, in one of the broken lines of the list was ἐπιούσι—, with the end of the word defaced. It is most unfortunate, however, that scholars who wish to double-check this information are unable to do so, for the papyrus fragment has disappeared and cannot be found. Furthermore its loss is particularly distressing because Sayce (whose shortcomings as a decipherer of Greek papyri were generally recognized) may have misread the householder’s list. And in any case, even if Sayce did correctly read the word, lexicographers do not know much more about its meaning than was known before, namely, that the expression signifies either “daily bread” or “bread for tomorrow.” In such cases when a word is susceptible of two equally legitimate renderings, translators have no choice except to place one in the text and the other in a footnote.—Bruce M. Metzger, “Persistent Problems Confronting Bible Translators”.”

The Roman Catholic Church, the largest and oldest Christian Communion by far, instructs its faithful via the Catechism of the Catholic Church that there are several meanings to epiousios, and that “epi-ousios” is most literally translated as super-essential:

“”Daily” (epiousios) occurs nowhere else in the New Testament. Taken in a temporal sense, this word is a pedagogical repetition of “this day,” to confirm us in trust “without reservation.” Taken in the qualitative sense, it signifies what is necessary for life, and more broadly every good thing sufficient for subsistence. Taken literally (epi-ousios: “super-essential”), it refers directly to the Bread of Life, the Body of Christ, the “medicine of immortality,” without which we have no life within us. Finally in this connection, its heavenly meaning is evident: “this day” is the Day of the Lord, the day of the feast of the kingdom, anticipated in the Eucharist that is already the foretaste of the kingdom to come. For this reason it is fitting for the Eucharistic liturgy to be celebrated each day.”

This unique word only used with the metaphoric “Bread” of life could mean “for morrow” meaning a “time to come” and not “daily” as is traditionally translated in most bibles.

δίδου (didou)

give
Verb. to give.

ἡμῖν (émin)

us
Pronoun. dative of ἡμεῖς • (hēmeîs) (first person plural, personal pronoun) we, for us, our

τὸ (to)

that
Article. ὁ (ho) m, ἡ f (hē), τό n (tó)
(Epic, demonstrative) that
(Epic, third person personal pronoun) he, she, it, they
(relative, Epic, Ionic, poetic Attic) who, which, that

καθ’ (kath’) 

for
Preposition. Apocopic form of κατά (katá) (used before a rough breathing).
κᾰτᾰ́ (katá) (+ genitive) downwards, down from, into, against
κᾰτᾰ́ (katá) (+ accusative) downwards, along, through, in, towards, during, for, for the, purpose of, according to, in conformity with

ἡμέραν (ēmeran)

The Day (Judgement Day)
Noun. feminine of a derivative of ἧμαι hêmai (to sit) meaning tame, that is, gentle; day, that is, (literally) the time space between dawn and dark, or the whole 24 hours (but several days were usually reckoned by the Jews as inclusive of the parts of both extremes); figuratively a period (always defined more or less clearly by the context): – age, + alway, (mid-) day (by day, [-ly]), + for ever, judgment, (day) time, while, years.
a specific day coming, “Judgement Day”

Translating Luke 11:3 word for word, we have:

(GRK) τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δίδου ἡμῖν τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν
(Direct Eng) the bread our the morrow give us that for Day
(Modern Eng) Give us the Bread of Eternity on the Day of Judgement
(NIV)  Give us each day our daily bread.
(KLV) Give us day by day our daily bread.

And the next and final verse of the Lord’s Prayer according to the Book of Luke.

Luke 11:4

(GRK) καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν, καὶ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἀφίομεν παντὶ ὀφείλοντι ἡμῖν· καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν.
(NIV)  Forgive us our sins, for we also forgive everyone who sins against us. And lead us not into temptation.”
(KLV) And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

Translating Luke 11:4 from Greek, word for word:

καὶ (kai)

and 
Conjunction. and, even, also

ἄφες (aphes)

forgive
Verb. singular- ἀφίημι cancel, forgive; allow, tolerate; leave, forsake, let go, divorce.

ἡμῖν (émin)

us
Pronoun. dative of ἡμεῖς (ēmeîs) (first person plural, personal pronoun) we, for us, our

τὰς (tas)

the
Article. accusative plural article: the

ἁμαρτίας (amartias)

Sin
Noun. genitive singular form of αμαρτία (amartía). Sin, Transgression, Debauchery, Affair. Wrong doing.

ἡμῶν (émón)

our
Pronoun. genitive of ἡμεῖς (hēmeîs) (first person plural, personal pronoun) we, us, our

καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν

and forgive us the sin our

Specifically important in this verse is the last part: τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν, which translates as “the sin our“.

In other words, τὰς ἁμαρτίας “The Transgression” is ἡμῶν “Ours”.

This isn’t ‘our sins'(plural) in general, but The Sin that pissed God off in the first place. This is the transgression many call ‘The Original Sin’. In the Book of Genesis when Adam and Eve ate from the forbidden Tree of Knowledge and were banished from Eden. When we fell from His Grace and were no longer seen favored in His eyes.

This action pissed God off and He’s still mad about it.

On face value, what’s the big deal? I mean, you put this tree out there in a garden and tell us we can eat from all of the trees, except these forbidden two.  That’s like having a big red button and saying, “don’t push”. We’re going to push the button. Human curiosity simply overwhelms us. It doesn’t take much to tempt us with anything really.

Well, we must understand the concept of metaphors and symbolism. The “fruit” or “apple” is not an actual fruit growing from a tree. It’s a metaphor, say for example: the reward for your work. The Fruit of my labor. Th ‘fruit’ is what I have produced or made, here is the fruit of my labor. The result of my work and effort.

The “tree of knowledge’ or “tree of knowledge between good and evil” is also a metaphor for ό λόγος (ό Lόgos).

ό λόγος (ό Lόgos) is the Greek word and concept for “Divine Knowledge, Reason and Logic”.

What is the significance of this “Great Sin” of mankind stealing the forbidden “Divine Knowledge” (the Original Sin).

To understand what exactly the “Divine Knowledge” or “ό λόγος” and why it was a HUGE Sin to steal it, we must look to ‘The Beginning’ as told in the Book of John.

In the New International Version of the New Testament, John 1:1-5 reads as:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was GodHe was with God in the beginning.

λόγος (lógos) Noun.

  • That which is said: word, sentence, speech, story, debate, utterance.
  • That which is thought: reason, consideration, computation, reckoning.
  • An account, explanation, or narrative.
  • Subject matter.
  • (Christianity) The word or wisdom of God, identified with Jesus in the New Testament.

That’s the basic definition of λόγος (lógos) and this is the part that gets my attention.  Normally it is translated as “Word” and is interpreted as meaning the Word or Wisdom of God, identified with Jesus in the New Testament.

On a basic understanding I guess that is good enough, but there is a much deeper meaning behind the concept of λόγος (lógos) to the Ancient and Hellenistic Greek Period which influenced the author’s choice in words in their writing.

The word λόγος (lógos) had a deeper meaning in Ancient Greece.

Lógos (Ancient Greek: λόγος, from λέγω lego “I say”) is a term in western philosophy, psychology, rhetoric, and religion derived from a Greek word meaning “ground”, “plea”, “opinion”, “expectation”, “word”, “speech”, “account”, “reason”, “proportion”, “discourse”.  It became a technical term in philosophy beginning with Heraclitus (c. 535–475 BCE), who used the term for a principle of order and knowledge.

Lógos is the logic behind an argument. 

Lógos is what you use to persuade an audience using logical arguments and supportive evidence. Lógos is a persuasive technique often used in writing and rhetoric.

Ancient Greek philosophers used the term Lógos in different ways.

The sophists used the term to mean ‘discourse’ and Aristotle applied the term to refer to “reasoned discourse” or “the argument” in the field of rhetoric.

The Stoic philosophers identified the term with the divine animating principle pervading the Universe.

Under Hellenistic Judaism (the time of Jesus and the Apostles), Philo (c. 20 BCE – 50 CE) adopted the term into Jewish philosophy. The Gospel of John identifies the Lógos, through which all things are made, as divine (theos), and further identifies Jesus Christ as the incarnate Lógos.

Despite the conventional translation as “word”, it is not used for a word in the grammatical sense; in the grammatical sense, the term lexis (λέξις) was used.  So it is not “The Word” or “Word of God”, otherwise the word lexis (λέξις) would have been used in John’s Writing.

He used the word λόγος (lógos), which had a much deeper meaning than simply meaning God’s Word. Had he simply meant ‘God’s Word’, he would have used the word lexis (λέξις) and it would have been written as θεός λέξις (Theós Lexis). The author used the word λόγος (lógos) because it had a much deeper meaning which his fellow Hellenistic Judaism audience understood.

The concept of λόγος (lógos) in Hellenistic Judaism

Hellenistic Judaism was heavily influences by Ancient Greek thinking and philsophy. The concept of lógos would have been understood and discussed in great length by people in that day. 

This must be considered when translating the writing of that area and time period.

The Septuagint (from the Latin septuaginta, “seventy”) is a Koine Greek translation of a Hebraic textual tradition that included certain texts which were later included in the canonical Hebrew Bible and other related texts which were not. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament.

In the Septuagint the term lógos is used for the word of God in the creation of heaven in Psalm 33:6.

“By the word (lógos) of the LORD the heavens were made, their starry host by the breath of his mouth.”
-Psalm 33:6 (NIV)

Philo of Alexandria (20 BCE – 50 CE) was a Hellenized Jew who used the term lógos to mean an intermediary divine being, or demiurge.

Philo of Alexandria

Philo followed the Platonic distinction between imperfect matter and perfect Form, and therefore intermediary beings were necessary to bridge the enormous gap between God and the material world. The Lógos was the highest of these intermediary beings, and was called by Philo “the first-born of God”. Philo also wrote that “the Lógos of the living God is the bond of everything, holding all things together and binding all the parts, and prevents them from being dissolved and separated”.

Plato’s Theory of Forms was located within the Lógos, but the Lógos also acted on behalf of God in the physical world. In particular, the Angel of the Lord in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) was identified with the Lógos by Philo, who also said that the Lógos was God’s instrument in the creation of the universe.

So, Lógos isn’t the Word, but closer to the logic or reasoning of the living word. The conscious incarnate. Lógos is a being which exists as part of the self of God. It is the intellectual and conscious Will of God.

It is a being’s very thought and will as a conscious essence. The free will of thought and action.

A being’s very conscious and will. Their mind merged with the essence of their very being is what the λόγος (lógos) is in concept.

The λόγος (lógos) is the very essence of God, the Will of God, the very essence of reason.

This changes the meaning behind the very first verse in the Book of John extra substantially. It is more than a mere word or law or God. It is the very conscious being and will of God. 

John 1: In the beginning of everything there existed the living essence of thought and reason behind free will,

So this is the Original Sin. The fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. We stole the λόγος (lógos) which separated us from everything God had created and made us like us.

We weren’t ready and He probably wasn’t even sure if He was going to give it to us – so we stole it.

Yeah, he’s still pissed about it. So pissed, he’s going to toast the lot of us. He made that VERY clear – He’s mad.

So Luke 11:4

τὰς – ἁμαρτίας – ἡμῶν
the –  sin –  our

Is the specific Sin of which He is talking about in The Lord’s Prayer.

Forgive us for stealing the λόγος (lógos), the living will and essence of reason and logical thought.
We stole the Light and became able to separate it from the Darkness.

We stole Enlightenment. This was the grave Sin of Humanity. The theft of The Divine Light.

And the rest: καὶ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἀφίομεν παντὶ ὀφείλοντι ἡμῖν·

καὶ (kai)

and 
Conjunction. and, even, also

γὰρ (gar)

for
Conjunction. for, since

αὐτοὶ (autoi) 

those
Pronoun. Nominative masculine plural form of αυτός (aftós) these, they, them

ἀφίομεν (aphiomen) 

forgive
Verb. pres act indic, 1 pl -ἀφιημι cancel, forgive; allow, tolerate; leave, forsake, let go, divorce.

Παντὶ (panti)

all
Adjective. all, as a whole.

ὀφείλοντι (opheilonti)

first-chosen
Noun. ὀφε is a prefix for ‘first’ often used in regard to the ‘first’ day of the week, etc.

είλοντι is from εἵλοντο meaning ‘to take, to select, choose, or prefer’.
Είλοντι is plural of ‘selected, taken, chosen, preferred’, making its meaning: The Chosen, The Selected, The Preferred.
ὀφε + είλοντι = ὀφείλοντι = ‘the first selected’ or ‘the first chosen’.

ἡμῶν (émón)

our
Pronoun. genitive of ἡμεῖς (hēmeîs) (first person plural, personal pronoun) we, us, our

καὶ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἀφίομεν παντὶ ὀφείλοντι ἡμῖν
and for those forgive all “first chosen’ our

This is asking for forgiveness of the “first chosen” – the Jews for breaking the Covenant and for rejecting him, which led to His execution where He even prayed for their forgiveness in saying, “forgive them Father, for they know not what they do”.

The rest of the verse: καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν.

καὶ (kai)

and 
Conjunction. and, even, also

μὴ (mē)

not
Particle. not

εἰσενέγκῃς (eisenenkēs)

lead
Verb. lead in, carry in, bring in, deliver

ἡμᾶς (ēmâs) 

us
Pronoun. accusative of ἡμεῖς (hēmeîs): us

εἰς (eis) 

into
Preposition. into

πειρασμόν (peirasmon) 

tribulation
Noun. second declension from πειρᾰ́ζω (peirázō, “to prove”) +‎ -μός (-mós).
test, trial, proof, or tribulation

καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν
and not lead us to (the) tribulation

This part is asking to be led or taken away from the “Great Trials” or “Tribulation”. Asking for mercy to be “Raptured” before the “Great Tribulation” and Judgement.

ΚΑΤΑ ΛΟΥΚΑΝ 11:4
Luke 11:4 and forgive us the sin our, and for these forgive all “first chosen’ our, and not lead us into trials.

Translating Luke 11:4 word for word, we have:

(GRK) καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν, καὶ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἀφίομεν παντὶ ὀφείλοντι ἡμῖν, καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν.
(Direct Eng) and forgive us the sin our, and for those forgive all “first chosen’ our, and not lead us to (the) tribulation
(Modern Eng) Forgive us for Our Sin, and forgive the first chosen, and gather us away from tribulation
(NIV) Forgive us our sins, for we also forgive everyone who sins against us. And lead us not into temptation.
(KLV) And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

Directly translated and then paraphrasing to match Modern English used today, we get:

Father, praise to your sacred name, your Kingdom is coming.
Give us the gift of eternal life.
and forgive us for Our Sin, and forgive the first chosen, and gather us away from tribulation

Here is the King James Version (KJV) of The Lord’s Prayer from Luke 11:2-4:

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth.
Give us day by day our daily bread.
And forgive us our sins; for we also forgive every one that is indebted to us.
And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil.

The Lord’s Prayer from Luke 11:2-4 in the International Standard Version (ISV) reads as:

‘Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come.
Give us each day our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, for we also forgive everyone who sins against us.
And lead us not into temptation.”

The Original Greek of Luke 11:2-4 (ΚΑΤΑ ΛΟΥΚΑΝ 11:2-4) reads as:

Πάτερ, ἁγιασθήτω τὸ ὄνομά σου· ἐλθέτω ἡ βασιλεία σου·
τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δίδου ἡμῖν τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν·
καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰς ἁμαρτίας ἡμῶν, καὶ γὰρ αὐτοὶ ἀφίομεν παντὶ ὀφείλοντι ἡμῖν·
καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν.

I would dare take the Modern English version if it were delivered by the Gospel of Luke today, instead of being nearly lost in translation over the past 2000 years, as:

Father, praise to your sacred name, your Kingdom is coming.
Give us the gift of eternal life.
Forgive us for Our Sin, and forgive the first chosen, and gather us away from tribulatio

and take it a step further by writing it as:

Our Most Sacred and Blessed Father, your Kingdom is coming.
Forgive us for Our Transgression and forgive those of the first chosen.
and grant us mercy away from Tribulation and give us the gift of eternal life.

I believe this is the ‘what about’, ‘how’, and ‘why’ Jesus was trying to teach us when we pray to The Father. Not a prayer for bread given to use daily. He already gave us our daily bread when he created everything – the fruits, grains, etc.. for us to rule over. So why would Jesus tell us to pray for something the Father has already provided? Why should we pray for our deplorable daily sins and transgressions. That just hints “that’s okay if you say ‘sorry'” – To the Father, it is NOT. He’s made it very clear on a number of occasions.

Jesus was trying to teach us to pray for what we don’t have or what was denied of us, such as the gift of eternal life. Something Jesus constantly reminded us about using the metaphor of “Bread of Life”.

He also told us to pray for forgiveness, not for small daily sins or sins made against us, but for the BIG grave Sin when we stole The Enlightenment from the ‘Tree of Knowledge between Good and Evil’. We were not only disobedient, but arrogant by thinking if we stole the λόγος that we would be like The Father, Like Gods.

It is asking for forgiveness for stealing Enlightenment and humbling ourselves by recognizing that we are NOT gods by praising His Name.

It is asking forgiveness for the First Chosen, the Hebrews gathered by Moses who had broken His Covenant with them. Not just that, but also for Him (Jesus) as the Messiah and having Him executed.

The prayer is about praising the Father and His coming Kingdom and asking to for mercy to be spared the Great Tribulation to be suffered before Judgement. To be forgiven and spared Final Judgement and be given Eternal Life.

I believe, if this prayer and message were delivered today, it would read:

Father, Sacred is Your Name and Blessed is the Coming of Your Kingdom.
Forgive us for Our Transgression and forgive those of the first chosen.
and grant us mercy away from Tribulation and give us the gift of eternal life.

Sources:

~

written by Njord Kane © 2017 Spangenhelm Publishing

 


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