Articles

Here’s your warning: The Coming of Apophis

apophis

This is a writing in progress. You may or may not be aware, but there’s a giant rock headed towards us called, ‘Apophis’. If you weren’t aware, then here’s your warning: There’s a giant rock headed towards us. Notice, even though I put that in bold, I still only ended it with a period(.) instead of an exclamation mark (!). That is because you know what, I try not to worry about things I have absolutely no control over. However, that does not stop my curiosity. Okay, so… There’s a…

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A Review: The Hidden Hollow, what is this story about?

A review of “The Hidden Hollow” Although this is a work of fiction, The Hidden Hollow by Njord Kane reads like history come to life. I did not put this book down and my favorite part… the creature in the woods. When I read the description, “A historical fiction that carries you into the fantasy world of Norse myth and Viking legend“, my first thought was “great, another Beowulf story – just what we need”.  I was expecting some half-naked muscle bound super vikings walking around smashing each other in the head. I was…

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The Hidden Hollow

The Hidden Hollow by Njord Kane Awakened late in the night, his life is changed forever. The events that follow propel him on a journey that only the foolhardy or desperate would risk. He is led into the forest and up the mountain – into a whole world of secrets in itself. This is only the beginning of his adventures. Something is stirring in the forest, something more ominous than the rising threat across the seas. Fearful travelers whisper of a darkness breathing in the forest, disturbing it, corrupting it.…

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The Hidden Hollow

A historical fiction that carries you into the fantasy world of Norse myth and Viking legend.   Awakened late in the night, his life is changed forever. The events that follow propel him on a journey that only the foolhardy or desperate would risk. He is led into the forest and up the mountain – into a whole world of secrets in itself. This is only the beginning of his adventures. Something is stirring in the forest, something more ominous than the rising threat across the seas. Fearful travelers whisper…

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The Class Structure of Ancient Maya Society

Ancient Maya society was no different than any other society around the World during this time period. Their society was broken into a class structure, which followed how other civilizations were. You had the ruling class, the nobility (“almehenob”), the priesthood (“ahkinob”) and often scribes would be at this level as well, the common folk (“ah chembal uinieol”), and of course, the slaves (“pencatob”). The most powerful of the ruling elite was known as the “halach uinic” or “true man,” which makes a fifth class in some cases. The halach…

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The Maya Creation Story

We get the Maya version of Creation from The Popol Vuh. The Popol Vuh describes the creation of the Earth by the wind of the sea and sky, as well as its sequel. Their are many variations of the creation story by different Maya groups. The Book of Chilam Balam of Chumayel relates the collapse of the sky and the deluge, followed by the raising of the sky and the erection of the five World Trees. The Lacandon Maya people also knew the tale of the creation of the Underworld. BTW, there…

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To the Ancient Maya, being Cross-eyed was being favored by the Sun God

A highly desired physical trait in Maya culture was to be cross-eyed (strabismus). Maya mothers would suspend an object between the eyes of their infants in an attempt to artificially induce the desired crossed-eyed trait.  It was in hopes their child would be handsome, favored and have a good future. Having crossed eyes was considered honoring “Kinich Ahau,” the cross-eyed Maya Sun god (also “Sun Lord”), in order to appease and gain his favor.  Because of this, it was also considered a god-like handsome trait as well. Kinich Ahau (K’inich…

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The Sacred Quetzal Feather

The people of MesoAmerica revered the feathers of the resplendent quetzal bird (Pharomachrus mocinno). The resplendent quetzal was considered divine and associated with the “snake god” by Pre-Columbian MesoAmericans. The Maya had a symbolic system of colors: black for weapons (obsidian), yellow for food (corn), red for war (blood), and blue for sacrifice. The royal color was green, the color of Kukulkan —the feathered serpent god. <See: The Sacred Colors of the Maya> The colors of the resplendent quetzal were that of the feathered serpent god, Kukulkan, also known as Q’uq’umatz by the Maya…

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The Ancient Maya wore a stone helmet called the Kohaw

The Maya had a war helmet made of pyrite stone called a “Kohaw.” These unique helmets were only worn by special soldiers such as the Ajaws (or Ahau meaning ‘Lord,’ which usually was a nobility title) and Kaloontes (meaning supreme warrior or military ruler).  An example of these ‘Kohaw’ helmets were found inside a queen’s tomb in the El Perú site, also known as the ‘Wak,’ in northern Guatemala. The queen’s tomb was uncovered at a site in the ancient Maya city-state of El Perú, which was the capital of…

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Maya Houses, a Man’s House is his Ajawil

For the most part, the architectural splendor of the Maya civilization can be accredited to that of the common man. Their building ingenuity started at the lowest level with the construction of their very own homes. The Maya built their houses with very steep roofs that were made of thatch or palm leaves. This prevented the rain from getting through and into the house. Their roofs were also made to drop very low in the fronts in order to protect the inhabitants inside against the hot sun and rains. These low…

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